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10 things that haunt apple ipad

Posted by GRT on Saturday, February 20, 2010 , under , | comments (1)




And this is according to gadgetophilia. Whilst the dust settles on Apple's recently announced iPad, it seems the hype has died down and everyone has an opinion on Apple's latest creation. In short, there is nothing that deserved the hype and the device simply sucks if said politely. Here are some reasons why this device fails:
1. No MultitaskingDo you know that if you concentrate on only one thing at a time, you can do that more efficiently than otherwise. Apple has come out with its own way to teach us that old proverb. No multitasking on iPad. Come on Apple! We want to listen to music when browsing the net or we want to download some files while we are watching a video. Earlier I said that we have little or no use of multitasking on a mobile phone due to its limited screen size but this is certainly not true for a device that is trying to replace a full fledged laptop or netbook.
2. Uncomfortable KeyboardThis was quite obvious that the iPad would have a virtual keyboard because there is no space for an actual hardware keyboard. And those who have used virtual keyboard, know that typing even an e-mail on it may be a headache and if you are a blogger or just a professional who have to type for a few hours, this is simply not the device for you. From the pictures available on the net, if you thought that you can just put the device on the table and type on the virtual keyboard like a normal keyboard, soon you'll find it impossible as the device's back is not perfectly flat and it kind of wobbles when you put it on a flat surface. This makes the virtual keyboard more difficult to use. However, you can connect a Bluetooth keyboard to the device and continue typing comfortably but then I have to say that you can also add two more wheels to your existing two wheeler to ride it like a car!
3. No WebCamYesterday I posted that the device should at least have an WebCam that will allow us to conduct video chat over a high speed internet connection. But Apple, with their infinite wisdom has decided that they can allow VoIP calls over 3G. We are very very pleased that you have given us your kind privilege to use the service. Oh! Apple is so generous! A cheap $400 Asus Eee PC Netbook can do VoIP or Video Chat through its WebCam but those devices are cheap anyway and Apple is obviously the synonym of glamor.
4. No Flash SupportEven if the standard smartphones have the flash support built-in their browsers nowadays, neither iPhone nor the iPod has the Flash support. And now, iPad also comes without the Flash support. The lack of Flash support in those tiny display browsers were pardonable but in a device that is going to be competing with the full fledged netbooks/laptops, this is going mean a deal breaker for many. Even the casual internet users won't forgive those gaping holes in the webpage which were supposed to be making the website more colorful. And also, forget about streaming video on webpage!
5. Ugly Adapters
You need to connect any device to the iPad? You just need to have the adapter for that device. Oh! We are so glad that we can at least connect our devices to it! Thank you Apple for your generosity to us. History will remember this.

6. Go to Apple Store for AppsiPad can only run apps from the Apple App Store. No other Apps shall be entertained. Period.
7. No HDMI
Want to watch those nice HD Videos in your big HDTV screen when your iPad screen seems too small? No there is no HDMI to view the HD videos you've just downloaded from iTunes. And it is a sin that you thought the Apple iPad would connect to some Samsung HDTV. You shouldn't expect that Apple will allow follow any standard interface. They'll rather create an interface of their own!

8. Battery
We carry a spare wheel with our car. The Car can go flat. I will then replace that with my spare wheel. But forget this simple things with Apple. Touch their battery and void the warranty. They list that the battery life will last for 10 hours but I doubt if it will run for any longer than six hours. This is too low especially if we keep in mind that some netbooks(=computers) are now able to reach the 10 hour mark.

9. MicroSIM
Did anyone know that such term existed before Apple declared it? Well, I guess not. The device is supposed to be unlocked and you can use any carrier with it but currently, the SIM is only available from AT&T. Therefore, don't expect to run it on any cheap T-Mobile plans because they don't have the SIM. Do you know any other carrier that uses this SIM? The answer is apparently, Ahem, No.

10. Too Big Bezel
Don't you also think that the Bezel is too big to be called a decent one? 

The other dimension of ipad

Posted by GRT on Tuesday, February 2, 2010 , under , | comments (1)



you all might have heard of the latest release of ipad by Apple this comes with it has got all features that are outstanding from playing music to browsing the net but did you ever wonder about the inside of a ipad here i give you some interesting insights into what ipad is made of :

Notion Ink Tablet

Posted by GRT on Wednesday, January 6, 2010 , under | comments (1)




While the world waits breathlessly for the Apple tablet, or the iSlate, Bangalore based Notion Ink has launched Adam—the world’s first 10.1-inch tablet with Pixel Qi display. Pixel Qi is a display made from standard LCD material,

SilverPac Evolution 5500

Posted by GRT on , under | comments (1)





The Evolution 500 is a gorgeous universal remote that can control any number of devices and also access content from your desktop computer. Powered entirely by Windows 7, it uses Microsoft’s SidesShow technology that lets you control your PC content via small widgets, or mini programs, and syncs your digital library via Windows Media Center. 
  • 4.3 inch touch-color LCD display with a resolution of 480 x 272
  • ARM9 processor
  • 1GB flash
  • 256MB SDRAM
  • Built-in speaker and microphone
  • 3-axis motion sensor
  • Ambient light sensor
  • Capacitive buttons
  • Windows Embedded CE 6.0 R2
  • Microsoft Media Center support
  • Support for 100 devices
  • Activity and learning function
  • Rechargeable 3760 mAh battery
  • Firmware upgrade and rechargeable from mini-USB
  • 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi
  • Z-Wave
  • Photo Sync from live.com

Google nexus gets ready to shake up iphone

Posted by GRT on Monday, January 4, 2010 , under , | comments (1)





    GOOGLE sure does love shaking up the system. Remember the original Google search page? It made news because your search results popped up fast and weren't cluttered with ads. Remember when Google went public? It made news because the founders auctioned off shares to the public. Remember when Gmail came out? It made news because it offered 1,000 times the free storage space of competitors like Hotmail and Yahoo.
    And now Google wants to shake up the way we buy cell phones—by letting you shop for the phone and the service independently, on a new Google Web site (Google.com/ phone).
    To introduce this phone store, on Tuesday, Google took the wraps off what may be the worst-kept secret on the Internet: a brandnew cell phone, designed by Google and made by HTC, called the Nexus One. It's pretty sweet, it advances the state of the art, and it's a welcome addition to the catalog of great app phones like the iPhone, Palm Pre and Motorola Droid.

    But the truth is, the Google news this week isn't quite as earthshaking as Google seems to think it is.
    First, the new phone. It's almost exactly the size and shape of the iPhone. Like most HTC phones, it's bland-looking. But it's so thin and rounded, it feels terrific in your hand.
    It's loaded with gleaming, attractive features. It's hard to choose which is more gratifying: the speed—instant, smooth response when you're opening programs and scrolling—or the huge, 3.7-inch touch screen, which has much finer resolution than the iPhone (480 by 800 pixels, versus 320 by 480).
    There's Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, like an iPhone, but also a removable one-day battery and a
camera with a LED flash, autofocus and picture settings, although the photos themselves are roughly on par with the iPhone's.
    The Nexus has no physical keyboard—only an on-screen keyboard, with a handy suggestion feature that I actually prefer to the iPhone's.
    Radically enough, you can also dictate anywhere you can type. The transcriptions aren't what you'd call miraculous—accuracy is maybe 90 percent—but if you have simple messages, speak clearly and remember to pronounce your punctuation, this "experimental" feature is often much faster than typing.
    As you'd guess, the Nexus uses Google's own Android operating system, so it's very similar to, for example, the Motorola Droid phone.

    You get an impressive, free, turn-by-turn GPS navigation program, and soon you'll be able to buy a bedside dock that automatically turns the Nexus into a terrific alarm clock/weather/music station.
    There's better integration all around: You can upload pictures and videos straight to YouTube, Picasa, Facebook and so on, for example, and you can tap a person's name and choose how you want to initiate contact (email, phone, text message). And you have five "home screens" to fill with the icons of your apps (up from three on the Droid). All of these changes will soon come to other Android phones as a software update.
    Despite these goodies, the Nexus is missing some important features that iPhone fans take for granted. For starters, the Google app store is much smaller, featuring 18,000 fun little games; there are well over 100,000 for the iPhone.
    Worse, even if you find a lot of good ones, you
might not have anywhere to install them. The Nexus can accommodate memory cards up to 32 gigabytes (a 4 gigabyte card comes with it)—and yet, inexplicably, the Nexus allots only the tiniest sliver of that (190 megabytes) for downloaded apps.
    There's no physical ringer on-off switch
(you have to do it on the screen), and therefore no way to tell by touch if the ringer is off, as you can on the iPhone and Palm phones.
    Sadly, the Nexus One also lacks a multitouch screen like the iPhone's. So zooming into photos and Web pages is awkward and hard to control. Finally, the Nexus just doesn't attain the iPhone's fit and finish. The buttons under the screen (Back, Menu, Home, Search) are balky, often ignoring your finger-presses completely.
    But maybe it doesn't matter if the Nexus One isn't nirvana. Google says it's only the first Google phone of many, with one store to sell them all.

    Google hopes to expand its online phone store, to really shake things up, to put some fear into the entrenched industry players. It plans to sell more phones, from Google and other companies, each with a choice of carriers. It's a noble ambition.
    But at the start, at least, the results are a pair of head-scratchers. The Nexus One is an excellent app phone, fast and powerful but marred by some glitches and missing features -- a worthy competitor to the Droid, if not the iPhone.

Its now lenovo's smart phone

Posted by GRT on Sunday, January 3, 2010 , under | comments (1)




Lenovo has announced a new smartphone  called LePhone specifically for the Chinese WCDMA market. It has a really nice 3.7-inch 480x800-pixel resolution display and a completely touch-based interface for navigation--no buttons here. It also boasts a 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, a 3.5mm headset jack, 3G data, Wi-Fi, A-GPS, plus a 3.0-megapixel camera and camcorder. However, the big news is that the LePhone runs a specially customized version of Google's Android operating system, which Lenovo is apparently calling the OPhone. It has integrated Twitter and Facebook applications plus an interesting proprietary 9-pin dock connector that lets you latch on an optional external keyboard. We don't know too much else about the Lenovo LePhone, but we probably won't get to get too close to it anyway--a representative from Lenovo has said that it has no plans to release it in the U.S. market.

Sony ericsson unviels its another Green Phone-Elm

Posted by GRT on , under , | comments (1)





The Sony Ericsson Elm handset is the latest addition by the handset manufacturer in its GreenHeart portfolio. 
      The Sony Ericsson Elm phone benefits the environment and helps reduce CO2 emissions. It has been made of recycled plastics and is free from hazardous chemicals. 

Favorite Money Management Gadget 2009

Posted by GRT on Saturday, January 2, 2010 , under | comments (2)




Sometimes a good thing can get better! In 2008, 47 percent of SavvySugar readers picked Mint.com as their favorite money management tool of the year and this year, 49 percent of you picked the green management tool again. What is it? 

The Most gifted on Amazon

Posted by GRT on , under , | comments (1)





Fresh off of the holiday, Amazon has announced that the Kindle is its most-gifted item in company history. While the company hasn't released exact figures for the holiday shopping season  the Kindle outsold popular toys, video games, DVDs, and books. 

Recall of Cressi Ellipse Black Regulator

Posted by GRT on , under | comments (1)





imageItalian scuba equipment manufacturer Cressi is working with the US consumer product safety commission on a recall of their Cressi Ellipse Black MC5 Regulator.


The problem involves a partial obstruction of the High Pressure (HP) port which can produce an inaccurate .........

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